Sunday, September 3, 2017

New music by War On Drugs, Shawna Caspi, Jessica Lea Mayfield, Liam Gallagher and more

There's a lot of buzz about A Deeper Understanding, the new release from The War On Drugs. The fourth album from Philadelphia-based Adam Granduciel and his band is certainly a worthy successor to its big breakthrough, 2014's Lost In The Dream. We've been playing and enjoying the single "Holding On" and now we're featuring "Nothing To Find," which sounds a bit like a Dylan song on speed. We'll be spinning more tracks from this album, too, but TBH we prefer it in single-song doses rather than on continuous play, as there is a bit of sameness to the sound from one song to the next.

We're not always the first to jump on a new record, and we've been slow to pick up on Manchester Orchestra's hit single, "The Gold," from the Atlanta band's fifth studio album, A Black Mile to the Surface. We'll make up for that by playing the full version of the track instead of the abbreviated "radio edit."

On the other hand, we're among the early adopters of Toronto singer-songwriter Shawna Caspi's new album, Forest Fire. It's just been officially released, but we've been playing the single "Never Enough" for several weeks. As that is one of the darker songs in the collection, we're now opting to add the upbeat "Love In A Moving Van" to our New Music rotation. Other highlights that you'll hear in our mix include "Numbers Game" and the Lynn Miles song "Brave Parade."

The lead single from Ohio singer-songwriter Jessica Lea Mayfield's upcoming album is sonically upbeat, but the lyric isn't so cheery. "Sorry Is Gone" is a break-up song that speaks of a break-away into independence. Mayfield told NPR Music that the song, written as she was separating from her husband and former co-producer, "represents my last apology, an apology for no longer being sorry."

Speaking of apologies, the new single from Liam Gallagher, of all people, is a bit of a mea culpa. In an interview with Noisey, he acknowledges that "For What It's Worth" is about regrets. But clearly the punk attitude is still there: "Obviously I've made a lot of mistakes. That's life. I guess it is an apology to whoever. I've pissed a lot of people off. But I'm certainly not gonna write a song for each and every one of them. There's one there. F---in' deal with it and move on." Gallagher also has called the track "the most Oasis-y song on the album," and we certainly agree, as it sometimes sounds like a chorus of "Don't Look Back In Anger" is about to break out.

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